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In-depth review of XO in German c't magazine

There's a glowing review of the OLPC project and its XO machine in the current issue 07/2007 of c't magazine. The in-depth article by Dr. Jürgen Rink describes the project's history and educational ambitions as well as its current prototype hardware and software. One very interesting detail is a comparison of the XO's novel dual-mode display in low light and bright sun light, at normal size and magnified:
On the left, under indoor lighting, the colored backlight shines through holes in the reflective layer. On the right, when brightly lit outdoors, the reflection is so strong that the backlight is not even visible anymore, thus creating a gray-scale image. The photographs show one of the example Etoys projects.

The magazine is available now at kiosks until next week, or via mail order. In a few weeks the article should be available online via click&buy.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hallo, leider muss ich das Kommentarfeld mißbrauchen um mit ihnen in Kontakt zu treten, weil ich leider keine eMail-Adresse gefunden hab. Ich bin Informatik-Student and der Uni Magdeburg und war in ihrem Vortrag zum OLPC im Fach Technische Informatik (letztes Semester) anwesend und will jetzt eine Presentation über das Projekt machen. Ich wollte mal fragen, ob sie evtl. wissen, wie man an passendes Material, wie Broschüren, Flyer, frei verwendbares Bildmaterial oder an einen Laptop kommt ;-) Ich würde mich über eine Antwort freuen.

MfG
Sascha Peilicke

sasch [dot] pe [at] gmx [dot] de

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