Skip to main content

ESUG 2010 in Barcelona

This year's conference logo was designed by my good friend Patty Gadegast.
I just returned from the European Smalltalk User Group conference in Barcelona, Spain. It was a really nice experience. There was too much going on to report everything here, so I will just pick some favorites.

Photo by Bert Freudenberg

The event was hosted by citilab Cornellà. It started off with a Camp Smalltalk over the weekend. I already met quite a few people there. I couldn't mingle as much as I hoped to because I had to get the first Etoys 4.1 release candidate out of the door:
Photo by Adriaan van Os
Close by was "Yokohama Wok", a Japanese/Spanish restaurant with the best all-you-can-eat buffet imaginable. You could have everything from freshly cut ham to sushi, grilled steak or seafood, bread, pasta, rice, fruits, cake, desserts.
Photo by Bert Freudenberg
I talked to Stef (president of ESUG) and gave him a Squeak Etoys button, which he ended up wearing the whole week:
Photo by Bert Freudenberg
We also played together in a 2-on-2 Magic game (which we promptly lost ...):

Photo by Bert Freudenberg
On Monday I gave my Squeak Community Update talk, outlining what has happened in the Squeak and Etoys communities lately. Got some nice comments afterwards, including the request to give an  Etoys demo the next time. I of course used Etoys to give the presentation, but did not really include an Etoys introduction for people who had not seen it before. But I got a slot in the "show us your projects" session on Tuesday where I made up for that with a 10 minute demo.
Photo by Adriaan van Os
Gonzalo Zabala and his students from Argentina presented Physical Etoys:
Photo by Adriaan van Os


I also liked the Xtreams presentation by Martin Kobetic:
Photo by Adriaan van Os

I was session chair on Wednesday morning, so I could see Travis' update on Pango text rendering from the first row. Would love to have that in Squeak, but it only builds easily on Linux:
Photo by Adriaan van Os

But the most exciting thing on Wednesday was of course that Physical Etoys won the ESUG Innovation Technology Award:
Photo by Adriaan van Os
On Thursday, I participated in a panel discussion about open-source licenses, organized by Julian Fitzell and Jason Ayers of Cincom.
Photo by Adriaan van Os

In the projects session, Ricardo demoed some of his Etoys work done during Google Summer of Code:
Photo by Adriaan van Os

Besides showing his graphing tools, the comic-like bubbles were a favorite with the audience:
Photo by Adriaan van Os

Dale showed the beginnings of Bibliocello, a repository for Monticello packages that can actually analyze them. You get to search implementors and senders across all packages, take statistics etc.
Photo by Adriaan van Os

And at the end of the day, an exciting demo was given by HwaJong Oh, a Smalltalker and iPhone developer from Korea. He demonstrated Drag-and-Drop for Squeak Tools, e.g. dragging the object held in an instance variable directly to another inspector.
Photo by Adriaan van Os

He also used cool animated mind-maps for his introduction:
Photo by Adriaan van Os

The highlight on Friday was Lukas' Helvetia presentation. I particularly liked the integration of PetitParser with the Smalltalk tools.
Photo by Adriaan van Os

All in all it was a rather refreshing conference at a great location with interesting people. Looking forward to next year's ESUG :)

Comments

FLORCIT@ said…
Congratulations Argentina!!!!

Popular posts from this blog

Frontend-only Multi-Player. Unlimited Bandwidth. Or: What is Croquet.io, really?

A multi-player web app needs a backend, right? What if I told you, it doesn’t? Read on for how Croquet gets rid of servers. No, really . Instantaneous Shared Experiences  is how we describe Croquet on our website. And while that excellently describes What Croquet does, as Croquet's Chief Architect, I wanted to share a bit about How we do that. So I wrote a Twitter thread . Here it is in blog form, slightly extended. Click the animation above if it does not play automatically Croquet lets you build completely client-side multi-user web apps. Read that again. Client-side. Multi-user. No I’m not kidding. I built it, I know it works. 😁  Croquet apps run completely client-side: can be hosted as a static web site no server-side code needed no networking code needed  Croquet is literally virtualizing the server: Instead of running code on a server (or in a serverless function) we run it as a virtual machine (VM) on each client.  Croquet carefully controls the inputs to these identi

Deconstructing Floats: frexp() and ldexp() in JavaScript

While working on my  SqueakJS VM, it became necessary to deconstruct floating point numbers into their mantissa and exponent parts, and assembling them again. Peeking into the C sources of the regular VM, I saw they use the  frexp ()   and ldexp () functions found in the standard C math library. Unfortunately, JavaScript does not provide these two functions. But surely there must have been someone who needed these before me, right? Sure enough, a Google search came up with a few implementations. However, an hour later I was convinced none of them actually are fully equivalent to the C functions. They were imprecise, that is, deconstructing a float using frexp() and reconstructing it with ldexp() did not result in the original value. But that is the basic use case: for all float values, if [ mantissa , exponent ] = frexp (value) then value = ldexp ( mantissa , exponent ) even if the value is subnormal . None of the implementations (even the complex ones) really worked. I

Emulating Smalltalk-76

If you got as excited as me about Dan Ingalls' live Smalltalk-76 demo on an actual 1970's Xerox Alto, you may have wanted to try it yourself.  For one, you could try my Smalltalk-78 VM. Smalltalk-78 is a leaner version of Smalltalk-76 but very much identical in syntax semantics.  It is also possible to run the full Smalltalk-76 environment, and here is how: First, you need an emulator for the Alto computer. Ken Shiriff posted a nice piece on how to run ContrAlto on Windows . It is written in C# and I got it to work on my Mac using Mono. So here's a step-by-step: Install Mono from  http://www.mono-project.com/download/ Download ContrAlto-mono.zip from https://github.com/livingcomputermuseum/ContrAlto/releases Download this Smalltalk-76 disk image: http://www.bitsavers.org/bits/Xerox/Alto/disk_images/chm/xmsmall.zip Unzip both  ContrAlto-mono.zip  and  xmsmall.zip  in the same folder. In a terminal, change to the ContrAlto directory and run mono Contralto.exe .